Young Epistemologist Prize - 2015

This will be the eleventh bi-annual Young Epistemologist Prize (YEP) to be awarded.  To be eligible, a person must have a Ph.D. obtained by the time of the submission of the paper but not earlier than ten (10) years prior to the date of the conference.  Thus, for the Rutgers Epistemology Conference 8-9 May, 2015, the Ph.D. must have been awarded between May 8, 2005, and November 10, 2014.

The author of the prize winning essay will present it at the Rutgers Epistemology Conference and it will be published in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.  The winner of the prize will receive an award of $1,000 plus all travel and lodging expenses connected with attending the conference.

The essay may be in any area of epistemology.  It must be limited to 6,000 words (including the footnotes but not the bibliography).  Please send two copies of the paper as email attachments in a pdf format to:

YEP@philosophy.rutgers.edu

One copy must mask the author’s identity so that it can be evaluated blindly.  The second copy must be in a form suitable for publication.  The email should have the subject:  “YEP Submission.”  The email must be sent by 8 pm (EST) on November 10, 2014. The winner of the prize will be announced by February 16, 2015.

By submitting the essay, the author agrees not to submit it to another publication venue prior to February 16, 2015, and agrees i) to present the paper at the Rutgers Epistemology Conference, ii) to have it posted on the conference webpage, and iii) to have it published in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.

All questions about the Young Epistemologist Prize should be sent to YEP@philosophy.rutgers.edu.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Sat, Apr 4, 2020 9:00 am-06:00 pm
[Cancelled] 3rd Annual Rutgers-Columbia Philosophy Undergraduate Conference
Sun, Apr 5, 2020 9:00 am-10:00 am
Prospectives Skype Meetings
Tue, Apr 7, 2020 8:00 am-07:00 pm
Prospectives Skype Meetings
Tue, Apr 7, 2020 9:00 am-10:00 am
Last day of prospectives

RECENT NEWS

  • Rutgers Students Learn the Art of Argument

    Students in Justin Kalef’s “Logic, Reason, and Persuasion” class at Rutgers University take a deep dive into some divisive issues. And they can expect, over the course of the semester, to have their positions challenged—perhaps by the person sitting next to them. Kalef, a teaching professor in the Department of Philosophy, School of Arts and Sciences, gets this undergraduate course underway by surveying students on such topical hot buttons as abortion, gun control, and tax policy. “Then I put them on...

WHY PHILOSOPHY?

button why philosophy

UNDERGRADUATE

Undergraduate

GRADUATE

revised grad student thumbnail IMG 4813

FACULTY

COPY faculty thumbnail IMG 1250