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730:201:B1 - Introduction to Logic Syllabus

PHIL 201: INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC
Instructor: Jennifer Wang
E-mail: jwang@philosophy.rutgers.edu
Time: 10:30am-12:20pm, MTWR
Location: Hickman 213, Douglass Campus
Office Hours: 9-10:15am Wednesdays, in Davison 138, Douglass Campus


Course Description:

This is an introductory class in formal logic.  With the help of the interactive computer software included with the textbook, we will learn how to use an artificial language called First-Order Logic (FOL).
 

Course Website
:

We have a website site at sakai.rutgers.edu.  Please check it regularly for announcements, lecture slides (posted after class each day), and additional materials.
 

Textbook
:

Language, Proof and Logic by Jon Barwise and John Etchemendy4    This textbook/software package can be purchased at the Cook-Douglass Student Co-op, or online.  You must purchase it new – the software requires a license that can only be used by one person and cannot be transferred.  We will be using the software extensively.4    You may install the software on your personal computer and submit electronic assignments from there.  The software can also be run directly off the CD-ROM elsewhere (like in a computer lab).  However, make sure to save files in your drive or on a flash drive. 

Requirements
:

You will be required to complete 10 homework assignments, two exams, attend all classes and do the assigned readings.  Reading assignments for each class and homework due dates are listed on the schedule.  There will be group and individual work during classes.  There will be no make-ups for the midterm without a valid excuse (like a medical emergency – do not schedule non-emergency appointments during any class).  There will be no make-ups for the final, period.
 

Attendance and Participation Policy:

Attendance will be taken at the beginning of each class.  Good attendance and frequent participation will count in favor of a student when determining final grades.
 

Late Submission Policy:

There will be a penalty for late submission of homework assignments, which are due on Mondays and Thursdays at the start of class.  For each day (every 24 hours starting at 10:30am) the assignment is late, 10 points (out of 100) will be deducted.  Some assignments have handwritten portions.  Because these cannot be submitted late over the weekend, I will only deduct 5 additional points after the electronic portion is submitted over the weekend (regular penalty holds), so long as the handwritten portion is handed to me at the start of class on Monday.  (If there is only a handwritten portion, then 20 points will be deducted for the entire weekend.  Otherwise, each weekend day counts.)

Example 1: Suppose you owe an assignment on Thursday, but you submit the electronic portion on Friday at 4pm and hand in the handwritten portion on Monday.  You will be penalized 25 points.

Example 2: Suppose you owe an assignment on Thursday, but you submit the electronic portion on Saturday at 10am and there is no handwritten portion.  You will be penalized 20 points.

Example 3: Suppose you owe an assignment on Thursday, but you submit the electronic portion on Friday at 8am and hand in the handwritten portion on Tuesday at 10:30am.  You will be penalized 50 points.

Example 4: Suppose you owe an assignment on Monday, but you submit the electronic portion on Tuesday at 10am and hand in the handwritten portion on Wednesday.  You will be penalized 20 points.

Example: Suppose you owe an assignment on Monday, but you submit the handwritten portion the following Monday and there is no electronic portion.  You will be penalized 50 points.

Clear? 

Grading

45%:    2 Exams (20% midterm, 25% final)
50%:    10 Homework Assignments (to be given out in-class or via sakai)
5%:      Attendance and Participation 

Rough Grading Scale
(A) 100-95: 0-1 minor errors
(A) 94-90: 1-2 minor errors
(B+) 89-85: 3-4 minor errors
(B) 84-80: 5-6 minor errors or 1 major error
(C+) 79-75: 6-7 minor errors or 1 major and 1-2 minor errors
(C) 74-70: 8-9 minor errors or 1 major and 3-4 minor errors
(D) 69-70: 10-11 minor errors or 2 major errors
(F) 59-0: 12+ minor errors or 3+ major errors


SCHEDULE

 
DateHomeworkReadingTopics

Week 1

05.26

05.27

05.28

   

HW 1 due

 

§1.1-1.4

§2.1-2.5

The Concepts of Logic

Introduction Atomic Sentences

Logical Consequence and Proof

NO CLASS

Week 2

06.01

06.02

06.03

06.04

 

HW 2 due

  

HW 3 due

 

§3.1-3.7

§4.1-4.4

§5.1-5.3

§6.1,6.2

Boolean Logic

Meet the Booleans: Ù,Ú,Ø

Four Key Concepts of Logic

Informal Boolean Proofs

Formal Proofs: Ù,Ú

Week 3

06.08

06.09

06.10

06.11

 

HW 4 due

  

HW 5 due

 

§6.3-6.5

§7.1-7.4

§8.1-8.4

Boolean Logic and Conditionals

Formal Proofs: Ø,^

Conditionals: The Basics

Conditional Proofs

Review for Midterm

Week 4

06.15

06.16

06.17

06.18

    

HW 6 due

  

§9.1-9.4

§9.5, 9.6

§10.1-10.4

Quantification

MIDTERM

Basics of Quantification

Translation

FO Validity and Consequence

Week 5

06.22

06.23

06.24

06.25

 

HW 7 due

  

HW 8 due

 

§11.1-11.3

§11.4, 11.5, 11.8

§12.1, 12.2

§12.3, 12.4

Logic of Quantification

Multiple, Mixed Quantifiers

Translation with Quantifiers

Steps, Existential Introduction

Conditional, Mixed Proofs

Week 6

06.29

06.30

07.01

07.02

 

HW 9 due

 

HW 10 due

 

§13.1, 13.2

§13.3

Formal Proofs

",$ Rules

Strategies and Tactics

Review for Final

FINAL EXAM
    

730:201:B1 - Introduction to Logic

730:201:B1 - Introduction to Logic



Syllabus

730:105:B6 - Current Moral and Social Issues Syllabus

Rutgers Summer 2009Current Moral and Social Issues

Syllabus  Instructor 

Serguei Denissov  supis405@gmail.com


Office Hours
 

The best time to meet in person is before or after class; if this is not convenient, e-mail me and we will set up another time.


Course Description
 

The goal for this course is for you to learn the basics of arguing intelligently about difficult moral and social problems.

 

The first lecture will be devoted to a brief crash course in moral philosophy in order to build a foundation for the subsequent discussions. We will spend the rest of the class examining various issues facing our society.

 
Textbook 

The book we will use is “Analyzing Moral Issues” 4th ed. by Judith Boss, © McGraw-Hill 2008. I will also distribute additional readings by e-mail.

 
In-Class Presentations 

Each one of you will do a 20 minute in-class presentation on one of the topics that we will discuss in class. Presentation topics will be assigned during the first class meeting.

 

Here’s what you need to cover in your presentation:

 
  • Explain to us what the issue is and identify why it is a moral issue (i.e. point out a conflict of rights or values);
  • If relevant, give a brief historical background: how the issue arose and/or how it has been dealt with by various societies at various times;
  • Give up-to-date status – relevant news, legislation, court cases, etc.;
  • Make comparisons to other countries, if relevant;
  • Point out major arguments, both pro and contra, making use of the moral notions introduced throughout the class.

You are also required to submit a write-up of the research you have done for your presentation. The write-up should include a list of sources (internet sites, magazines, newspapers, etc.), a brief statement of the arguments, any relevant statistical data and anything else that you used in preparing your presentation. The write-up is due on the day of your presentation (you can submit it by e-mail). You may – in fact, I encourage you to – submit drafts of your presentation to me for review and suggestions.

 

The presentation is worth 30 points.


Review Papers
 

There will be 3 short review papers (4 pages each). In these papers, you will need to answer questions related to the issues listed below. In your papers you should review the arguments presented in the textbook and the additional readings that I provide and conclude by presenting your own opinion.

 

Here are the paper topics:

 
 

TOPIC

QUESTIONS

DUE DATE

Paper 1

Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide

 

1)     Is it ever morally permissible to assist someone in ending his/her life?

2)     Does there exist a right to receive assistance in ending one’s own life?

3)     Does a physician’s duty to relieve suffering conflict with his or her duty to preserve life?

 

June 11

Paper 2

Same-sex Marriage

 

1)     Is there a “right to marry”? Does our society violate gays’ and lesbians’ fundamental rights by not allowing them to marry?

2)     Do you agree that allowing same-sex marriages is harmful to the institution of “traditional” heterosexual marriage?

 

June 23

Paper 3

The AIDS Epidemic in the Developing World

 

1)     Do we have a duty to help AIDS victims in the developing countries? Explain why or why not.

2)     If your answer to 1) is “yes”, explain exactly what kind of assistance we have a duty to provide.

3)     If you answer “no”, reply to Thomas Pogge’s arguments in his articles “World Poverty and Human Rights” and “Montreal Statement on the Human Right to Essential Medicines”.

 

July 2

 

All papers are due by midnight on the due date. You can hand in your papers in class or e-mail them to me.

 

Each paper is worth 20 points.


Attendance and Participation
 

By attending class and participating in discussions, you show your interest in the material and what you have learned. While there is not always a positive correlation between how much a person has to say and how much he or she knows, the willingness to try and speak in front of an audience should count for something. Therefore, your attendance and participation will be worth 10 points.

 

In order to get the full 10 points, you have to attend AND to participate. If you attend every class but never say a word (except, of course, during your presentations!), you will get 5 points out of 10.


Components of Your  Grade
 

Presentation

 

30

Papers

 

60

Attendance + Participation

10

 Total:  100

Grading Scale
 

91-100 = A, 81-90 = B, B+, 71-80 = C, C+, 61-70 = D, D+, 60 or below = F.

730:105:B6 - Current Moral and Social Issues Readings

Rutgers Summer 2009Current Moral and Social Issues
Class Dates + Readings
 


The textbook for the class is:

 
  • “Analyzing Moral Issues” 4th ed. by Judith Boss, McGraw-Hill 2008
 Additional readings will be distributed by e-mail. 
DATE TOPICREADING

May 26

TUE

Introduction to the Class 
  • An introduction to moral philosophy
  • Moral theories
  • How to argue about moral issues

Chapter 1

May 26

THU

Abortion 
  • The abortion debate
  • The use of embryos in the medical field
  • Stem cell research

Chapter 2

June 2

TUE

Biotechnology and Ethics 
  • Genetically modified organisms (GMOs)
  • Genetic screening and discrimination on the basis of genetic information
  • Genetic engineering and enhancement
  • Cloning
 

Chapter 3

June 4

THU

Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide 
  • Is it ever morally permissible to end one’s own life?
  • Is it ever morally permissible to assist someone in ending his/her life?
  • Does there exist a right to receive assistance in ending one’s own life?
  • Does a physician’s duty to relieve suffering conflict with his or her duty to preserve life?
 

Chapter 4

June 9

TUE

 
Crime and Punishment in Contemporary Society 
  • Moral issues in retributive justice
  • Society and crime
  • American correctional system
  • Firearms and crime: do we need some form of gun control?
  • Death penalty
 

Chapter 5

June 11

THU

Drugs, Alcohol, Cigarettes, Gambling 
  • Drugs: individual freedom vs. communal morality
  • Legalization of drugs vs. war on drugs
  • Other addictive products: alcohol and cigarettes
  • Addictive behaviors: gambling
 

Chapter 6

 Paper 1 due: Euthanasia 

June 16

TUE

 
Sexuality, Family and Marriage 
  • Society’s attitudes towards sexuality
  • Homosexuality
  • Decline of the “traditional” family
  • Polygamy
  • Same-sex marriage
  • Assisted reproductive technology
 

Chapter 7

June 18

THU

Prostitution and Pornography 
  • What (if anything) is morally wrong with prostitution?
  • Are there good arguments for why prostitution should be legal?
  • What (if anything) is morally wrong with pornography?
  • Do prostitution and pornography contribute to oppression of women?
 
 

June 23

TUE

Immigration and Related Issues 
  • Immigration: moral questions
  • Does immigration benefit society?
  • Illegal immigration
  • Bilingual education
  • English as the official language
 
 
 Paper 2 due: Same-Sex Marriage 

June 25

THU

Globalization and Economic Justice 
  • Globalization and free trade
  • World poverty and economic justice
  • The AIDS epidemic in the developing world
  

Chapter 10

June 30

TUE

War and Terrorism 
  • Just war theory
  • The war on terrorism
  • Use of torture
  • Security and civil liberties
 

Chapter 11

July 2

THU

The Environment and Animal Rights 
  • Global warming
  • Do Western societies consume too much?
  • Demographic issues
  • Animal rights issues
 

Chapter 12

 Paper 3 due: The AIDS Epidemic in the Developing World 
    

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